This Morning viewers slam outrageous kids show about man with worlds longest penis – Daily Mail

Loading ....

Danish presenter claims children’s cartoon about man with the ‘world’s longest penis’ sends a positive message about ‘being yourself’ – but This Morning viewers brand it ‘outrageous’

  • Cartoon ‘John Dillermand’ literally translates to ‘John Penis Man’ in Danish slang 
  • Animation made its debut on Danish children’s channel DR Ramasjang in January
  • Presenter Ulla Essendrop defended show saying it sends a positive message
  • Viewers branded show ‘mad’ and insisted they would not let their child watch 

This Morning viewers have insisted they would not let their children watch a Danish cartoon which tells the story of a man with the ‘world’s largest penis’. 

John Dillermand – which literally translates to ‘penis man’ in Danish slang – follows the adventures of its eponymous character who performs impressive feats with his member. 

The animation made its debut on children’s channel DR Ramasjang in January, with Danish presenter Ulla Essendrop and Stine Liv Johansen, a professor in children’s use of media, defending the cartoon. 

Ulla argued the main message of the show is to ‘be who you are’, and that the programme, aimed at children aged four to eight, explores topics children are ‘beginning to become curious about’ at that age. 

John Dillermand - which literally translates to 'penis man' in Danish slang - follows the adventures of its eponymous character who performs impressive feats with his member (pictured using it to light a BBQ)

John Dillermand - which literally translates to 'penis man' in Danish slang - follows the adventures of its eponymous character who performs impressive feats with his member (pictured using it to light a BBQ)

John Dillermand – which literally translates to ‘penis man’ in Danish slang – follows the adventures of its eponymous character who performs impressive feats with his member (pictured using it to light a BBQ)

Danish presenter Ulla Essendrop appeared on This Morning to defend the show,  arguing the main message of the cartoon is to 'be who you are'

Danish presenter Ulla Essendrop appeared on This Morning to defend the show,  arguing the main message of the cartoon is to 'be who you are'

Danish presenter Ulla Essendrop appeared on This Morning to defend the show,  arguing the main message of the cartoon is to ‘be who you are’

But viewers weren’t convinced, with one saying they ‘dread’ their child seeing the show, while another branded the cartoon ‘outrageous’.   

‘The director of the children’s channel says its not meant to be particularly educational about bodies, or sexuality,’ said Ulla. 

‘It is meant as an absurd slapstick universe that explores topics children of that age are beginning to be curious about. 

‘The director also says the main message of the show is John needs to learn to own up to his mistakes, and the creator of the show says that being who you are is more important than image.’ 

Viewers weren't convinced, with one saying they 'dread' their child seeing the show, while another branded the cartoon 'outrageous'

Viewers weren't convinced, with one saying they 'dread' their child seeing the show, while another branded the cartoon 'outrageous'

Viewers weren’t convinced, with one saying they ‘dread’ their child seeing the show, while another branded the cartoon ‘outrageous’

One puzzled parent wrote: ‘I dread my 8 or 9 year old possible seeing that crude cartoon! What on earth!?’ 

Another raged: ‘Absolutely outrageous, no way children should watch this.’ 

A third conceded: ‘The world has gone mad, kids cartoons with a character with a 20 foot long penis? WTF?’   

From rescue missions and taming lines to flying like a helicopter, lighting barbecues and stealing ice-cream from unsuspecting kids, there is ‘almost nothing John can’t do with his penis’, as is explained in the show’s theme song. 

The show sparked debate over what is appropriate for children aged four to eight - the show's target audience. Pictured: John using his penis to water his neighbour's garden

The show sparked debate over what is appropriate for children aged four to eight - the show's target audience. Pictured: John using his penis to water his neighbour's garden

The show sparked debate over what is appropriate for children aged four to eight – the show’s target audience. Pictured: John using his penis to water his neighbour’s garden

However, Danish presenter Ulla insisted that her three-year-old son watches the show and is ‘blissfully unaware’ of what the theme tune means. 

‘My son is three-and-a-half and he finds it funny, but I’m not sure he completely grasps what that 8-metre creature actually is 

‘He runs around the house and sings the theme song gladly and loudly, blissfully unaware of that the theme song means, 

‘Its a perfect starter to speak with children about curiosity regarding the body – the fact we are all different and not being concerned about what others might think of you.’ 

Mother Ulla insisted to hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield (both pictured) that her three-year-old son watches the show and is 'blissfully unaware' of what the theme tune means

Mother Ulla insisted to hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield (both pictured) that her three-year-old son watches the show and is 'blissfully unaware' of what the theme tune means

Mother Ulla insisted to hosts Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield (both pictured) that her three-year-old son watches the show and is ‘blissfully unaware’ of what the theme tune means

Professor Johansen agreed that parents should not see the characters member as a 'sexualised penis' and that it 'explores the curiosity children have of bodies'

Professor Johansen agreed that parents should not see the characters member as a 'sexualised penis' and that it 'explores the curiosity children have of bodies'

Professor Johansen agreed that parents should not see the characters member as a ‘sexualised penis’ and that it ‘explores the curiosity children have of bodies’

Professor Johansen agreed that parents should not see the characters member as a ‘sexualised penis’ and that it ‘explores the curiosity children have of bodies’ at that age.

‘I don’t think you should think of it as a penis, she said. ‘It’s not how we would think of a penis as an adult.

‘It is a penis as such, but not a sexualised penis. It is 20 foot long and striped and I assume not anything a male individual has in his pants. It is an absurd and exaggerated body part and explores the curiosity children have of bodies at that age.’

 

Loading ....